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Yves Tiberghien

Yves Tiberghien

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Yves Tiberghien, Professor of Political Science and Director Emeritus of the Institute of Asian Research at the University of British Columbia, is a visiting scholar at the Taipei School of Economics and Political Science.

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  1. The Global Economy Is More Vulnerable Than It Seems
    subacchi41_ViaframeGetty Images_worldcrackingglobebreaking Viaframe/Getty Images

    The Global Economy Is More Vulnerable Than It Seems

    May 20, 2024 Bertrand Badré & Yves Tiberghien identify five factors driving a potentially catastrophic trend toward fragmentation.

  2. Navigating a World in Shock
    badre24_ANWAR AMROAFP via Getty Images_lebanonprotest Anwar Amro/AFP via Getty Images

    Navigating a World in Shock

    Sep 20, 2022 Bertrand Badré & Yves Tiberghien identify eight overlapping crises that have emerged in the absence of effective multilateralism.

  3. The Pandemic Must End Our Complacency
    badre12_phil roeder_getty images_UN Phil Roeder/Getty Images

    The Pandemic Must End Our Complacency

    Jun 18, 2020 Bertrand Badré & Yves Tiberghien think COVID-19 has exposed a deeper crisis of globalization that demands new forms of collective leadership.

  4. Toward a Euro-Pacific Partnership
    laidi27_GettyImages_tugboatoceanfromabove Getty Images

    Toward a Euro-Pacific Partnership

    Jul 5, 2019 Zaki Laïdi, et al. advocate forming a new bloc of countries to serve as a united front against protectionism and illiberalism.

  1. op_benami1_LOUAI BESHARAAFP via Getty Images_syriaconflict Louai Beshara/AFP via Getty Images

    Anatomy of a Massacre

    Shlomo Ben-Ami

    The 1860 massacre of Christians in Damascus holds useful lessons about what it takes to arrest – and recover from – inter-communal violence. But there is a difference between a pogrom and a genocide, and conflating the two can do more harm than good.

    considers what the 1860 massacre of Christians in Damascus can and cannot teach us about preventing genocide.
  2. GettyImages-2156649816 Photo by Nikolas Kokovlis/NurPhoto via Getty Images

    AI: Hope or Hype?

    Whether generative artificial intelligence will do more harm or good to our families, economies, and societies remains an open question. In devising strategies for harnessing the technology, optimism is undoubtedly warranted, but it should not come at the expense of realism.

  3. ehrenreich1_Francis DeanCorbis via Getty Images_denmark eu Francis Dean/Corbis via Getty Images

    How Denmark Keeps the Far Right at Bay

    Michael Ehrenreich explains how mainstream parties have neutralized the threat of right-wing populists.
  4. slobodian1_ Drew AngererGetty Images_peterthieltrump Drew Angerer/Getty Images

    How Techno-Libertarians Fell in Love with Big Government

    Quinn Slobodian argues Silicon Valley investors are against the state only insofar as it is not enriching them personally.
  5. gros187_CostfotoNurPhoto via Getty Images_china semiconductor Costfoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images

    How Chinese Savings Can Support the Global Green Transition

    Daniel Gros urges the EU to welcome cheap low-carbon goods, such as electric vehicles, from China.
  6. menino1_Michael NigroPacific PressLightRocket via Getty Images_divest Michael Nigro/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

    Who’s Afraid of Colonization?

    Frederico Menino thinks the concept can be repurposed to help overcome the deficiencies of current social advocacy.
  7. Electric car charging Sergei Fadeichev/Getty Images

    Europe Needs Chinese Investment

    Dalia Marin urges European policymakers to focus on boosting FDI flows from technologically advanced economies.
  8. laidi31_CHRISTOPHE ENAPOOLAFP via Getty Images_macron Christophe Ena/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

    Why Macron Is Risking an Election

    Zaki Laïdi points out that the French president has little to lose by dissolving parliament after two years of paralysis.
  9. ash1_SERGEY BOBOKAFP via Getty Images_ukraine destruction SERGEY BOBOK/AFP via Getty Images

    The Economic Case for Seizing Russia’s Frozen Assets to Support Ukraine

    Timothy Ash rebuts the main arguments against confiscating Russian reserves to fund Ukraine’s defense.

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